Globe-americas
INT
English EN Portuguese PT Spanish ES
Globe-americas
INT
English EN Portuguese PT Spanish ES

2021 Durham Election: Mayor & City Council (Wards I-III)

VOTE IN DURHAM’S ELECTION

Primary Election Day is Oct. 5
General Election Day is Nov. 2

Pick the City’s Leaders in 2 Elections

Who should be Mayor? Or a City Council member?

CANDIDATES FOR MAYOR

Vote for 1

Seven candidates seek election as Mayor; the two with the most votes in the Primary advance to the General Election, where the one with the most votes wins. All city voters may vote for 1 candidate for Mayor in the Primary and 1 candidate in the General Election. The elections are nonpartisan, with no party labels. The Mayor presides at City Council meetings and serves a two-year term. The Mayor and the six other City Council members appoint the City Manager, adopt ordinances, and oversee the functions listed at the end of this guide.

Rebecca Harvard Barnes

Website: RebeccaHarvardBarnes.com
Background:
My experience comes from many years of public service as a social justice advocate, Minister in the PCusa, Educator, Community Builder, Conflict Resolution Consultant, Counselor, Manager. I love Durham and have lived here since 1980.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

None submitted by candidate

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

  1. climate control – Implementing the City’s Sustainability Roadmap increasing the timeline of our goals.
  2. public safety (specifically gun violence) – a safer Durham for ALL of its residents.
  3. inclusion & equity – addressing root causes of poverty.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

As the City of Durham works collaboratively to onboard a new chief of police, every policy decision and budget will need to be transparent and filtered with reconciliation, inclusion, equity and public safety for everyone in Durham.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Continued implementation of the city’s strategic plan with community development, transparency with the City’s Five-Year Affordable Housing Investment Program, collaboration with DHA and HUD and a simplified process for obtaining assistance.

Recorded Transcript

Charlitta Burruss

Website: None submitted by candidate
Background: My love for government and its history which pushes me to preserve the system to a place and show what good Government will look like in Durham. All my experiences have been Outreach.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

None submitted by candidate

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Crime and Housing, has brought about stress and the climb of both and not being able to live in Durham which brings about homelessness if we cannot come together with a solution it will get worse. I am about Action and Results.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

Higher Salaries for Officers and Incentives to bring them here. Dialogue between Officers/Community to bring back the trust and morals on both sides so the Community will feel comfortable talking with Police Department.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

High paying jobs, Classes on Home Ownership and there rights as a Tenant/Landlord both should be held liable for the Property besides normal wear and tear so People can feel safe where they reside.

Recorded Transcript

Javiera Caballero

Website: JavieraForMayor.com
Background:
I’m a Durham City Council Member running for Durham Mayor. My experience has prepared me to step in as Mayor on day one with a full understanding of the functions of city government and the tools available to us to best address our challenges.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Durham Association of Educators, Durham’s People’s Alliance PAC

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Affordable Housing, Community Safety, & Sustainability

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

In Durham we are beginning to create practical alternatives to our current public safety practices. The city has a new Community Safety Department. We need to be able to deploy the appropriate response when a resident calls 911.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

We fully funded the affordable housing bond overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2019. It is the largest affordable housing effort ever mounted in NC.

Recorded Transcript

Sabrina (Bree) Davis

Website: DavisforDurham.com
Background:
Social Entrepreneur & Researcher. Experienced in Global Public Health/Policy, Law Enforcement (former Communications Officer), Social/Clinical Research and Community Organizing.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

None submitted by candidate

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

As newly elected mayor of Durham I would vigorously tackle our public health crisis, economic and racial inequities, and climate change.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

I would work in tandem with our new Police Chief, our dedicated Law Enforcement Officers and Public Safety Officials to fortify our bold new vision to ensure the welfare and safety of Durham residents as well as transparency and accountability.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

I support inclusionary zoning policies that require that some percentage of newly developed housing is set aside for low and moderate income families.

Recorded Transcript

Jahnmaud Lane

Website: jahnmaud4mayor.com

No response from candidate

Recorded Transcript

Elaine O’Neal

Website: ElaineONeal.com
Background:
I am a Durham native and have served as the first female Chief District Court and Superior Court judge in Durham, first alum to lead the NCCU Law School and chair of the Durham Racial Equity Task Force. I’ve been trained by the City to lead.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People, Friends of Durham

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

My top priorities are gun violence prevention; affordable homes/housing; and bringing wealth-building opportunities to all of Durham. These will ensure not just the survival of our residents, but our ability to thrive together.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

I am a relationship builder. I will use my leadership position to improve police-community relations and will ensure that the people most directly impacted by policing are involved in any decision-making and accountability.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Development must be community-centered and equitable. The city should support tenant groups, tenants who want to buy housing; ensure those in ancestral homes and underserved neighborhoods are able to secure safe and affordable homes.

Recorded Transcript

Daryl Quick

Website: Facebook – Daryl Quick 4 Mayor
Background:
I am the founder of Brother’s and Sister’s United. I have been working as a mentor for 15-20 years of my life. I have also worked as an advocate against gun violence. I’ve worked with city council, police department, city manager, and Mayor’s office.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

None submitted by candidate

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Ending violent crime, discounted to free programs for youth, roads and infrastructure. I believe having a plan for the violent crime in Durham will give citizens peace in being in Durham. I also believe having programs for youth will keep them safe.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

I have worked with law enforcement and the community. I have a good relationship with both. The community trust me and with a new Police chief, I will work to see a partnership exists with them both.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

We should reduce taxes on home owners. Give tax breaks/incentives to those that do upgrades.

Recorded Transcript

Durham City Council (Ward I)

Vote for 1

In addition to the Mayor, Durham voters elect six City Council members to serve four-year terms on a staggered basis.  This year, the three who must    reside in specific parts of the city or Wards are elected; in 2023, the three “at large” members are elected. All voters may vote in each contest. Ward I has four candidates; the two who gain the most votes in the Primary will advance to the General Election, where the one with the most votes wins.

Waldo Fenner

No response from the candidate

DeDreana Freeman

Website: DeDreanaFreeman.com
Background:
I have an MPA degree from NCCU, four years on council and experience in grassroots community-led organizing including work in my neighborhood, the Democratic Party, faith community and leadership roles at the city, county, state, and national level.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Collective PAC, Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People, Vote Mama

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Income inequality, along with affordable housing, remains one of our biggest issues. Community health and safety, if done right, could save our children’s future. I envision an equitable Durham where everyone can safely live, work and play.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

I use my role to ensure community transparency and accountability with open communication and regular follow-ups with community residents. All of the city departments are accountable to the taxpayers and residents of our community.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

The city can implement a local equity fund focused on reparative transformational initiatives for Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and low wealth people.

Recorded Transcript

Marion T. Johnson

Website: MarionTJohnson.com
Background:
Issue expertise: paid leave, fair pay, budget & tax policy, race equity; Local experience: UAW Local 2320 chair, Durham People’s Alliance board chair, participatory budgeting steering committee chair (current)

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Durham People’s Alliance, Durham Association of Educators, Run For Something

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Housing justice, community safety and justice, and economic justice.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

Parts of Durham feel abandoned by our system. Others feel criminalized. I’m equally concerned with what we do as a city as I am with making sure that residents feel brought along in this process.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Increasing city funding for transit-accessible affordable housing; Fully funding the Eviction Diversion program; Expanding legal aid to families facing eviction and homelessness; Increasing rent support for residents in public housing

Recorded Transcript

Elizabeth Takla

No response from candidate

Durham City Council (Ward II)

Vote for 1

Ward II has three candidates; the two who gain the most votes in the Primary will advance to the General Election, where the one with the most votes wins.

Robert L. Curtis, Jr.

No response from candidate

Mark-Anthony Middleton

Background: Prior to being elected to the Durham City Council I was part of the leadership apparatus of Durham’s largest, most diverse, grassroots organization Durham Congregations, Associations, and Neighborhoods (CAN).

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People, The People’s Alliance Political Action Committee, The Friends of Durham

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Gun Violence for the sake of our children. Continuing my work on Durham’s participation in Guaranteed Income for a robust safety net. Prioritizing the city’s Shared Economic Prosperity Plan for equitable wealth creation.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

I will advocate for a continued transformation of policing culture towards a community based model. Expanding response options to include mental health professionals is critical while still retaining the capability to respond to all other challenges.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Municipal land should continue to be used for affordable housing initiatives. A renewed emphasis on incentivizing developers to use the city’s density bonus should also be embraced. Sustained lobbying of the state legislature for more local autonomy.

Recorded Transcript

Sylvester Williams

Background: International Preaching The Gospel of Christ Jesus, Financial Analyst First Citizens Bank, Vice-Chair For Economic Development For Durham Committee On The Affairs Of Black People, Chair For Economic Development Durham Business And Professional Chain

Favorite endorsements for this election:

None submitted by candidate

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

With landlords and tenants being affected by the moratorium eviction we need to ensure that resources are properly directed. Businesses on the verge of shutting down due to the pandemic need someone who understands the financial climate.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

As a lover of the Lord Jesus the Only Begotten Son of the Living God I helped those affected by crime.  I have had correspondence with the sheriff and former Chief of Police offices. Defund the police is not an option.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Increases in residential property value can make a major impact on low-income or fixed-income households. Tax valuations should return to every eight years for those living in homes ten years. New employers should help subsidize affordable housing.

Recorded Transcript

Durham City Council (Ward III)

Vote for 1

Ward III has only two candidates so they are not on the Primary Election ballot. Both advance to the General Election, where the one with the most votes wins.

AJ Williams

Website: AJforDurham.com
Background:
I’m a 34 year old, Black, trans person, and I grew up in Durham, NC, in a poor and working class family. The recent years of my life have been defined by political work including organizing with Durham Beyond Policing.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Pierce Freelon, Durham City Council Ward 3, Councilmember; Loan Tran, Consultant, Board Member at the Highlander Research and Education Center

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Hiring qualified unarmed, skilled, responders, and administrative personnel to staff the Office of Community Safety & Wellness. Restructuring post-pandemic, small businesses into worker-owned models. Expanding protections for lower-income tenants.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

Much of my community organizing work has been centered around reducing the footprint of DPD in our city, and demanding stronger community investments. As a City-Council member, I’ll continue to work towards long term alternatives to policing.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

Providing stable rent, protections for tenants and more notice before evictions on RAD units, increasing funding for the Long-time Homeowner/Tax Assistance grant program, and creating initiatives that help residents build towards homeownership.

Recorded Transcript

Leonardo Williams

Website: LeoForDurham.com
Background: Former Educator to Small Business owner, I have prepared our youth for higher education and the workforce to hiring them as adults. I understand that process because I have lived it personally and professionally.

Favorite endorsements for this election:

Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People, Friends of Durham

What are your top 2 or 3 priorities if elected and how will they impact the daily lives of residents of your city?

Public Safety: Changing the trajectory of young Black men in Durham. Economic Mobility: Helping create access to financial independence. Affordable Living: Evolving the conversation and solutions for Affordable Housing to be more holistic.

The city council approves the budget and has an opportunity to offer visionary leadership as it relates to the Police Department. How will you use your leadership and elected position to ensure community transparency and accountability for the Police Department?

Commissions sanctioned by the city council to constituent-based advisory council to advise my decisions. Relationships must be formed beyond the annual review of the budget. Engaging police officers and residents together to share lived experiences.

What policies should the city pursue to improve the affordability of housing?

The city MUST better understand the players who are causing our housing market to be so volatile. Before we address affordability, we have to talk about accessibility. This is affecting a much broader base of residents even beyond the poverty line.

Recorded Transcript

ABOUT THIS 2021 GUIDE

This non-partisan Guide with tips about voting and profiles of the candidates is sponsored by Democracy NC and Common Cause NC, which are not affiliated with any candidate or party. Candidates had word limits for each answer; their unedited responses are in this Guide and also available at NCVoterGuide.org. Call 919-836-0027 ext. 3 for more about the Guide. A PDF copy of the Guide is posted at NCVoter.org.

Why Two Elections?

More than two candidates are running for Mayor and for the Ward I and Ward II Council seats. The Primary Election reduces the number of candidates for those offices to the two with the most votes; those two appear on the General Election ballot, and the one with the most votes wins. The City Council candidates for 2021 must live in a particular part of the city or Ward, but all voters get the same ballot. You may vote for 1 candidate for Mayor and 1 candidate for each Ward seat.

Your Power for What?

The ballot box is the one place where everyone is equal: one person, one vote. Use your power! People acting together can make change happen. Review the candidates’ responses and decide who should represent you. The Mayor and City Council make decisions affecting nearly every part of your life. They hire the city manager and oversee:

  • The Police & Fire Departments
  • Zoning & Building Code Enforcement
  • Neighborhood Renewal & Affordable Housing
  • Economic Development
  • Anti-Discrimination Ordinances
  • Recreation, Parks & Arts Programs
  • Tax Rates & the City Budget
  • Water, Sewer, Waste Disposal & Recycling
  • Appointments to the Planning Commission
  • City Govt. Employee Wages & Benefits

WHY I”M VOTING…

  1. “. . . too many of my ancestors died for me not to be using my right to vote.” – Kristen Marion
  2. “. . . I want someone in city hall fighting for issues important to our community.” – Robert Dawkins
  3. “. . . city elections can be very close, so my one vote could have a big impact.” – Angelica Robles
  4. “. . . it’s not just about who’s president. Who runs local government also affects me.” – Austin Padilla
  5. “. . . not voting would be giving my power away; we must use every tool we have to be heard.” – Rena McNeil

Do I Need an ID to Vote?

You do not need to show an ID to vote in 2021 except in two situations:

  1. If you use Same-Day Registration, you’ll need to show a document listed in the box on page 10.
  2. If you are a new voter in the county and some information was missing on your registration form, you may need to show a document listed in the box on page 10 or any current photo ID.

HOW TO VOTE BY MAIL (ABSENTEE BALLOT)

Any registered voter may vote by mail; no excuse or special reason is needed. To request a ballot, fill out a form online at demnc.co/portal or download at demnc.co/request (call 866-522-4723 or visit demnc.co/absentee for help.) The request form must be signed by the voter, voter’s “near relative” (defined on form) or guardian. It must be received (not just sent) at the County Board of Elections by 5 pm a week before Election Day (by Sept. 28 for the Primary Election and Oct. 26 for the General Election).

A ballot and return envelope will then be mailed to the voter. Follow all the directions carefully, including having two witnesses (or a notary) sign and include their addresses on the envelope form. Many absentee ballots are not counted because signatures or other important information is missing.

To count, the voter (near relative or guardian) must return the ballot to the County Board of Elections office by 5 pm on Election Day or if it postmarked by 5 pm Election Day, it must be received at the elections office by 3 days later. Mail early due to delays. Take it inside the post office and request a dated postmark if the dead-line is near. Mailing may take two stamps.

THINK YOUR ONE VOTE DOES NOT MATTER?

How just one person voted − or didn’t vote − determined the winners in the elections in 39 North Carolina cities in 2019. Your vote can decide who wins!

FINES, FELONIES & YOUR VOTE

You do NOT lose your right to vote if you have a traffic ticket, mortgage default, or outstanding civil fine, or if you are convicted of a misdemeanor.

If you are convicted of a felony, you temporarily lose your right to vote. Under current law, which is being challenged in court, you automatically get your voting rights back in North Carolina after you finish your full sentence, including probation or parole. It does not matter whether the felony conviction occurred in North Carolina or somewhere else.

Once you complete a felony sentence, your citizenship rights are automatically restored to you. No court document is needed to restore your right to vote. Just finish your sentence and register like any other citizen.

Failure to pay restitution does not block your right to vote, even if it is a reason for continued probation supervision. Other people on probation may also have their voting rights restored if a preliminary court ruling becomes effective; but as of mid-September, that ruling is on hold.

Resources for Voters

NCVoter.org and NCVoterGuide.org – how to register or check your registration status, vote by mail, find your poll, etc.

NCSBE.gov – NC State Board of Elections website with same info as above.

Vote411.org – League of Women Voters resource with candidate profiles and more.

Same-Day Registration

If you miss the deadline to register, you may use “same-day registration” during Early Voting at the site and times listed in the box on page 12. Ask the election official for a registration form, show an identifying document, and vote a ballot – all on the same day. You cannot use same-day registration on Election Day. The ID document you show must be one of these with your name and current address:

  • a NC driver’s license or other govt. photo ID;
  • a utility bill (cell phone, electric, cable, etc.);
  • bank statement or payroll stub;
  • student photo ID along with a school document showing the student’s address; or
  • a document from any government agency.(a bill, permit, letter, etc.)

EARLY VOTING SCHEDULE FOR PRIMARY AND GENERAL ELECTION

Durham offers 5 Early Voting locations for both the Primary and General Election. You may vote early at any of the 5 locations:

  • North Regional Library, 221 Milton Road, Durham 27712
  • South Regional Library, 4505 S. Alston Ave., Durham 27713
  • East Regional Library, 211 Lick Creek Lane, Durham 27703
  • NCCU Turner Law Building, 640 Nelson St., Durham 27707
  • Durham Co. Main Library, 300 N. Roxboro St., Durham 27701

PRIMARY EARLY HOURS, all sites: Weekdays, Sept. 16-Oct. 1, 8:30am-6pm; Saturdays, Sept. 18 & 25, 8:30am-1pm; Sundays, Sept. 19 & 26, 12-4pm; and Sat., Oct. 2, 8am-3pm.

GENERAL ELEC. EARLY HRS., all sites: Weekdays, Oct. 14-Oct. 29, 8:30am-6pm; Saturdays, Oct. 16 & 23, 8:30am-1pm; Sundays, Oct. 17 & 24, 12-4pm; and Sat., Oct. 30, 8am-3pm.

PRECINCTS & POLLING PLACES FOR ELECTION DAY

To find your Precinct’s polling place for Election Day, go to demnc.co/distr or call 919-560-0700

PRECINCT #

PRECINCT BUILDING

PRECINCT POLLING PLACE ADDRESS

PRECINCT 01 W J BROGDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL 1001 LEON ST, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 02 GEORGE WATTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 700 WATTS ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 03 E K POWE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 913 NINTH ST, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 04 N C SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND MATH 1219 BROAD ST, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 05 W I PATTERSON RECREATION CENTER 2614 CREST ST, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 06 LAKEWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2520 VESSON AVE, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 07 DURHAM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 400 N DUKE ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 08 MOREHEAD MONTESSORI MAGNET SCH 909 COBB ST, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 09 FOREST HILLS CLUB HOUSE 1639 UNIVERSITY DR, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 10 C C SPAULDING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1531 S ROXBORO RD, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 12 MONUMENT OF FAITH CHURCH 900 SIMMONS ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 13 BURTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1500 MATHISON ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 14 GREATER EMMANUEL TEMPLE OF GRACE 2722 E MAIN ST, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 15 HOLTON CAREER AND RESOURCE CENTER 401 N DRIVER ST, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 16 HOLY INFANT CATHOLIC CHURCH 5000 SOUTHPARK DR, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 17 DURHAM COUNTY MAIN LIBRARY 300 N ROXBORO ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 18 KIPP DURHAM COLLEGE PREP SCHOOL 1107 HOLLOWAY ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 19 AMERICAN LEGION POST #7 406 E TRINITY AVE, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 20 DURHAM COUNTY AGRICULTURAL BDG 721 FOSTER ST, DURHAM 27701
PRECINCT 21 CLUB BLVD HUMANITIES MAGNET SCHOOL 400 W CLUB BLVD, DURHAM 27704
PRECINCT 22 LAKEVIEW SCHOOL 3507 DEARBORN DR, DURHAM 27704
PRECINCT 23 HOLT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4019 HOLT SCHOOL RD, DURHAM 27704
PRECINCT 24 DPS STAFF DEVELOPMENT CENTER 2107 HILLANDALE RD, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 25 NORTHERN HIGH SCHOOL 117 TOM WILKINSON RD, DURHAM
PRECINCT 27 CREEKSIDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 5321 EPHESUS CHURCH RD, DURHAM
PRECINCT 28 BAHAMA RURITAN CLUB 8202 STAGVILLE RD, BAHAMA 27503
PRECINCT 29 GLENN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2415 E GEER ST, DURHAM 27704
PRECINCT 30-1 EAST REGIONAL LIBRARY 211 LICK CREEK LN, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 30-2 SOUTHERN HIGH SCHOOL 800 CLAYTON RD, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 31 BETHESDA RURITAN CLUB 1714 S MIAMI BLVD, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 32 NEAL MIDDLE SCHOOL 201 BAPTIST RD, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 33 LOWE’S GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 4430 S ALSTON AVE, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 34-1 PEARSONTOWN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4915 BARBEE RD, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 34-2 IVY COMMUNITY CENTER 4222 FAYETTEVILLE RD, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 35.3 CITY OF DURHAM FIRE STATION #18 1409 SEATON RD, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 36 YATES BAPTIST CHURCH 2819 CHAPEL HILL RD, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 37 COLE MILL ROAD CHURCH OF CHRIST 1617 COLE MILL RD, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 38 HOPE VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH 6900 GARRETT RD, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 39 ST STEPHENS EPIS CHURCH-PARISH HALL 82 KIMBERLY DR, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 40 ROGERS HERR MIDDLE SCHOOL 911 W CORNWALLIS RD, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 41 WHITE ROCK BAPTIST CHURCH 3400 FAYETTEVILLE ST, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 42 JAMES E SHEPARD MAGNET SCHOOL 2401 DAKOTA ST, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 43 FOREST VIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3007 MT. SINAI RD, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 44 NORTH REGIONAL LIBRARY 221 MILTON RD, DURHAM 27712
PRECINCT 45 TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH 4504 STERLING DR, DURHAM 27712
PRECINCT 46 EDISON JOHNSON COMMUNITY CENTER 600 W MURRAY AVE, DURHAM 27704
PRECINCT 47 HOLMES SR REC CENTER AT CAMPUS HILLS 2000 S ALSTON AVE, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 48 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB 1010 MLK PKWY, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 50 MCMANNEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 4102 NEAL RD, DURHAM 27705
PRECINCT 51 SOUTHWEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2320 COOK RD, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 52 EVANGEL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1011 LYNN RD, DURHAM 27703
PRECINCT 53-1 TRIANGLE GRACE CHURCH 5001 TUDOR PL, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 53-2 WAYPOINT CHURCH 6804 FARRINGTON RD, CHAPEL HILL
PRECINCT 54 SOUTH REGIONAL LIBRARY 4505 S ALSTON AVE, DURHAM 27713
PRECINCT 55-11 WEAVER STREET CENTER 3000 E WEAVER ST, DURHAM 27707
PRECINCT 55-49 NCCU – TURNER LAW BLDG 640 NELSON ST, DURHAM 27707

16 Tips for Voting!

All kinds of rumors circulate during elections. They may be aimed at making you think voting is too difficult to do. Here are 16 tips to equip you with the truth and make your voting experience easier.

  1. In this city election, you may vote for the candidate of your choice, regardless of the political party you listed when you registered.
  2. Ballots cast during Early Voting count just like those cast on Election Day. It’s a myth that they are not counted unless the election is close.
  3. You don’t need an excuse to request an absentee ballot. Any voter can use one. When you send the ballot back, be sure to sign the form. Follow the instructions carefully so your ballot is valid!
  4. The controversial voter ID requirement was postponed by court order. As a result, most voters generally do not need to show ID in 2021. However, new voters may still need to show ID. See the next item if you are a new voter.
  5. New voters may need to show an ID IF the ID number on their registration form could not be verified; they will need to show any photo ID or one of these with their name & current address: a utility bill; bank statement; payroll stub; or a government document (license, bill, letter, etc.).
  6. You don’t lose your right to vote if you have an outstanding warrant, traffic ticket, bankruptcy, or civil fine. No official will ask you about these.
  7. You may wear a button, hat or shirt with a candidate’s name when you quietly vote, but you may not actively draw attention to your choices.
  8. You may take a list of your choices inside the polling place to help you remember, but do not show the list to others or leave it. You may view a list on your cellphone but don’t use it as a camera; taking pictures is prohibited inside the poll.
  9. Be sure you are registered at your current address at least 25 days before the election. Register again if you move to a new address. If you miss the registration deadline, you can still register and vote at an Early Voting site during Early Voting, but you can’t do this on Election Day.
  10. If you’ve moved within your county, update your registration (and vote) during Early Voting. If you wait until Election Day, you may be sent to a different poll.
  11. On Election Day, go to your own precinct’s poll to vote. If you can’t get to your home precinct, you can vote using a provisional ballot at another precinct in your city. You should receive a phone number or website to learn if your ballot counted.
  12. Unless you intend to return to another county or state as your “home,” you may register at your current address, even if your address for tax purposes is in another county or state. This is important for students and military members.
  13. A voter with a disability may get assistance from anyone of their choice except their employer or union agent. Any voter may get help from a “near family member” (not a cousin). Tell the official at the intake desk that the person is helping you.
  14. Voters with a physical disability that makes walking or standing difficult may vote in a vehicle at the polling location’s curb. During the pandemic, curbside voting is also available for voters with medical/COVID-related issues.
  15. If you mark the wrong choice by mistake, ask the elections official for a new ballot to replace a “spoiled” one.
  16. If your name does not appear on the registration rolls or you have any problem when you vote, you should be offered a provisional ballot; you should be given a toll-free number or website to learn if the ballot gets counted or if not, why not.

If you have problems or see suspicious activity when you vote, call the Board of Elections at 866-522-4723 or the hot-line at 888-OUR-VOTE. To check your registration, see a sample ballot, find your polling place, or learn more about your voting rights, go to www.ncsbe.gov or www.NCVoter.org.

3 Ways to Vote for the Mayor and Durham City Council

Durham citizens may cast ballots in a two-step process to elect the city’s Mayor and three other members of the City Council:

  1. Vote in the Primary to narrow the field of candidates;
  2. then vote in the General Election to choose the final winners. The City Council makes decisions that affect virtually every part of your life – but you decide who wins!

3 Ways to Vote

1. Early Voting

Voting early is a good option, especially if you have moved or have not voted in several years. You can also register as a new voter in the county during Early Voting.

2. Mail-In Absentee Voting

Vote by mail from the comfort of your home. Any voter may use this method; no special reason is needed.

3. Election Day

On Election Day for the Primary and General Election, go to your precinct’s polling place. Polls are open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm. If you are in line at 7:30 pm, you’ll be able to vote. To find your precinct’s poll, go to demnc.co/poll or call the Board of Elections at 919-560-0700.  If you go to the wrong polling place in Durham and you don’t  have time to get to the right poll, ask to use a  provisional ballot. 

No photo ID is needed to vote …

. . . but if you are a new voter in the county and something was missing on your registration, you may be asked to show a document, such as a     utility bill or ID. It’s best to carry an ID with you.  

Questions?

Call the hotline! 888-OUR-VOTE Or 866-OUR-VOTE

 

Share